Frequently Asked Questions

Below you'll find a compilation of answers to questions we commonly hear from customers. If you cannot find what you're looking for, please don't hesitate to contact us. We want you to have the information you need to get the final result you want.

  1. How do I go about getting an estimate from you?
  2. How can I send my files electronically?
  3. What is the preferred industry software for the page layout and design?
  4. Why should I supply lasers and color separations with my disk?
  5. What is the proper resolution for use in a printed piece, and how large should I scan it?
  6. Why is including my fonts with my job important, can you just substitute your versions of the fonts?
  7. What font files need to be sent with my job and how do I collect them?
  8. What is a "proof"?
  9. Why do I need to look at a proof if I've already given you everything I need to have done?
  10. Do I still need to approve a proof if I bring my work in on disk?
  11. How long does it take for you to complete my order?
  1. How do I go about getting an estimate from you?

    Well, since you are here, we would suggest you use our online estimate request form. Otherwise, the best way to ensure that we get all the information necessary to do an accurate quote, give us a call and talk with one of our customer service representatives.

  2. How can I send my files electronically?

    Well, since you are here, we would suggest you use our online send a file feature.

    Choose the "send a file" button under our Service Area section. Fill out the form, browse for your file and hit "send file."
    You will receive an email confirmation. It's that easy!

    There are just a couple things to remember: always compress your file using StuffIt or WinZip, and use only 8 characters in the file name plus the extension, (.sit or .zip). This will make the transfer go smoothly.

    If you need further assistance, please give us a call.

  3. What is the preferred industry software for the page layout and design?

    QuarkXPress, Adobe PageMaker, and Adobe InDesign have many features that make them the most efficient in both file creation and final output within a professional printing environment.

  4. Why should I supply lasers and color separations with my disk?

    Customer provided hard copies eliminate guesswork and give us a clear picture of what the printed piece should look like. Providing lasers of the color separations also shows that the file has been prepared to separate properly during the final output.

  5. What is the proper resolution for use in a printed piece, and how large should I scan it?

    Pictures: 300 dpi is the standard resolution for scanning a continuous tone image (i.e. a photograph). An image should be scaled to no smaller than the size at which it will be used in the piece. Scanning it larger than the final size won’t do any harm. Furthermore, if the image is to be used more than once at various sizes, it should be scanned at the largest size.

    Line Art: 1200 dpi is the standard resolution for scanning line art or text.

    Graphics that are meant to be viewed over the Internet are typically saved in a low resolution format (such as .jpg or .gif) because this creates a small file size which allows for faster downloading. The resolution of these files is typically 72 dpi, which is an insufficient resolution for high quality printing.
    After an image is saved as low resolution, Increasing the resolution will not put back detail and sharpness which was not captured in the first place, it’s merely adding more pixels to a low resolution image.

  6. Why is including my fonts with my job important, can you just substitute your versions of the fonts?

    First of all, we may not have some or all of the fonts you used. Also, fonts carry programming information within them that affects how the lines of text break and determines how the characters appear on the screen and on the page when printing. These characteristics can vary from font manufacturer to font manufacturer, so substituting our different version of a particular font (i.e. Times) may cause dramatic and undesirable changes to the way the text flows within the document and the appearance of the final output.

  7. What font files need to be sent with my job and how do I collect them?

    If your files were created on a Macintosh and you are using Postscript Type 1 fonts, you will need to send both the printer fonts and the screen fonts; with Truetype fonts, there are no separate printer and screen font files to worry about. These files will most likely be found in the fonts folder located inside your Mac’s system folder. Simply highlight the fonts you need to collect, and drag them to the folder or disk onto which you are going to copy the fonts while holding down the option key. Please note that it is critical to hold down the option key in this process. Otherwise, you may move the fonts instead of copying them.

    On the PC, the most common font format is Truetype (.ttf files). These files will most likely be found in the fonts folder located inside your PC’s Windows folder. If you are using Postscript Type 1 fonts, you will need to send both the printer fonts and the screen fonts (there will be 2 files with the same name, except for the file extension of .PFB and .PFM). Simply highlight the fonts you need to collect, click Edit/Copy in your Windows Explorer window, move to the folder or disk onto which you are going to copy the fonts, and select Edit/Paste in your Windows Explorer window.

  8. What is a "proof"?

    A proof is a way of ensuring that we have set your type accurately and that everything is positioned according to your requirements. Typically, we will produce a proof which will be sent to you online or printed on paper which can be viewed in our store or delivered to you in person.

    On multiple color jobs, we can produce a color proof on our color output device to show how the different colors will appear.

  9. Why do I need to look at a proof if I've already given you everything I need to have done?

    We employ human beings to produce your work and, last time we checked, humans are imperfect. Your approval on the final proof is assurance that you have looked over every aspect of our work and approve it as accurate. This benefits everyone if errors are caught in the proofing process rather than after the job is completed and delivered.

  10. Do I still need to approve a proof if I bring my work in on disk?

    It may seem like a proof wouldn't be needed in this case but it really is. Output devices process digital information using a variety of processing languages. Your approval of the proof which we will provide assures that the output device used has correctly interpreted and processed the information you have provided.

  11. How long does it take for you to complete my order?

    There really isn't a short answer to this question. Some jobs can be produced in minutes and some jobs may take days. Let us know when you need your job completed and we'll let you know if it can be done. We go to great lengths to meet your most stringent demands.